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STAR CLUB ANNIVERSARY SHOW –HAMBURG April 9 2017

März, 22brian P...No comment
STAR CLUB ANNIVERSARY SHOW –HAMBURG April 9 2017 We were kids with dreams, and a love of rock n roll music. There was no road map for this. There was no “Fame Academy”, no pop music schools, no internet where videos of our musical heroes were a click away. There was only radio, where we could hear the American music we loved, and if we were lucky we might meet like minded young people and try to play together and perhaps perform at local dances. For some it might have ended there. But then came the Star Club Hamburg- and the stories which would become the stuff of legend. The Star Club has a pivotal place in rock n roll music folk lore. It hosted the big American stars, and was a magnet for young British bands. It was the place which taught us lessons in “stage craft”, what playing in a band together was really about, whilst giving us the opportunity night after night to improve our musical skills. It is where many of the musicians I most admire began their professional journeys and has given me some precious life long friends. From time to time there has been a “Star Club Night”-an event featuring some of the original artistes. We have seen some truly great Anniversary shows, and come to appreciate the significance not only of the musicians, but the loyalty of the public who are simply our old friends-our extended family. On 9 April at Downtown Blues Club, Hamburg, I will play a 55th Anniversary show together with Kingsize Taylor & the Dominos, Beryl Marsden, Karl Terry, Howie Casey and others.  The number “55” alone suggests that this must be the last such event we can expect. The music which I make today, the songs I have written-and the  history that walks onstage with me everytime I pick up a guitar to play for people, would be impossible had it not been for the Star Club. Gratitude does not begin to cover it. The Star Club shaped my life and the lives of all who were there. I do hope that many many old friends will meet with us in Hamburg to celebrate rock n roll. Come along , dress inappropriately and behave badly! You know you want to ! P.S. If you are too young to have been there, come along and soak up some of the original atmosphere!

Badger One Live Badger Review by G. W. Hill

August, 18ReviewsNo comment
BADGER_web Cherry Red Records is reissuing this album with a nice booklet and multi-layer digi-pack. When Tony Kaye left Yes he became the keyboardist in this group. They released this debut album (Yes, a live album as a debut) to showcase their sound. Interestingly enough, the gig at which it was recorded was one of two at London’s Rainbow when they were opening for Yes. Some of that band’s Yessongs album was recorded the same night. Honestly, if it weren’t for Kaye’s involvement in Yes, this would probably not land under progressive rock. It’s more psychedelia meets jam band, but there is some prog here. It should be noted that the recording quality of the show is good, but not studio quality.
Track by Track Review
Wheel of Fortune Imagine combining early Yes with Santana and some R&B. You’ll have a good idea of what this song sounds like. It has some smoking hot jamming with both the guitar and the organ really weaving some classic melodies.
Fountain The mix of sounds here is perhaps the same. Still, there is a bit more of a jam band kind of thing going on here. It definitely feels like psychedelia in a lot of ways. I dig the jam session mid-track. It’s one of the best musical passages of the disc. I also love the synthesizer solo section around the five minute mark.
Wind of Change This is one of the most easily accessible things here. It makes me think of the band H.P. Lovecraft to a large degree. It has some great song construction and the jamming is top-notch.
River In some ways, this doesn’t seem to work as well as some of the rest. That said, the psychedelia meets jam band kind of vibe does gel at times. There is a bit of a Doors element here at times.
The Preacher Now, this one is really classy. There is a bit of a soulful element here. The song just really rocks. It has a lot of style and charm.
On the Way Home This might be my favorite tune here. I love the vocal arrangement. The whole song is just very cool. It’s got a dramatic psychedelic rock sound to it. The instrumental sections take it closer to prog (and particularly early Yes) than anything else here.

Brian Parrish Traveller Review by G. W. Hill

August, 18ReviewsNo comment
Music-Street-Journal-Logo-550x550 Review by G. W. Hill - Brian Parrish - Traveller Brian Parrish is possibly best known for his work as part of the band Badger. This new solo album shows that he’s got what it takes to deliver great music on his own, though. If you were to just listen to the first song or two, you might think that this is an AOR prog disc. The first part of the album fits in that category. Beyond that, though, this is more of a mainstream blues rock disc. It’s a very strong one, too. Track by Track Review Land of the Night Games This comes in mellow, atmospheric and trippy. It works to a great fairly mellow groove for the song proper. There is a definite Pink Floyd kind of thing here, but with more of a psychedelic rock edge. The chorus hooks and other elements seem to bring an AOR rock element, too. Talk To Me This has a harder edged groove that’s very tasty. I really dig the tasty guitar solo later in the piece. Perhaps this is more mainstream rock than prog, but there are elements that make me think of both Pink Floyd and Supertramp in some ways. Kandy Road A bluesy rock tune, this is another classy number. I love the guitar sounds on this thing. There are some hints of psychedelia at times, along with hints of world music and prog. The world music jam at the end is definitely progressive, if perhaps not progressive rock. Either way it’s great. When It’s Over A pure old school blues rock jam brings this into being. There is a bit of a Grateful Dead vibe to it in some ways, too. There is definitely a soulful thing at play here. This cut has no prog at all in the mix. It’s closer, perhaps, to something Eric Clapton might do than it is to anything else. Traveller Now, this blues tune is classy for sure. I like the retro organ, and the whole thing feels like an electric blues thing from the 1970s. It’s quite cool. The female vocals add a lot, but the tune just oozes cool, anyway. Slow Riding The horns really add a lot to this. There is a lot of funk along with soul and more. It’s very mush a 70s kind of groove. It’s classy stuff, too. Blue A slower, mellower pure blues tune, this is so strong. It has some especially tasty guitar soloing. The Time Will Come Here’s a more energized, but no less bluesy tune. It’s a cool rocker that is very much a timeless kind of thing. Again Eric Clapton is a good reference. Summer Day A mainstream rocker, this still has a lot of blues in the blueprint. It’s a solid rocker. It’s not one of my favorites here, though. The saxophone solo is a nice touch. Angel of Death More of a pure blues tune, this has a lot of Eric Clapton in the mix along with some BB King. This is one of my favorites of the set. Love Like This There is a bit of a country edge to this mellower tune. It’s another class act, though. Don't Waste My Time There is something a bit like Pink Floyd in this tune, too. That’s tempered by more of a pure blues sound. Either way, this another cool tune. It has some nice touches for sure. Diamonds and Pearls Folk and country merge on this mellower number. It’s very old school in sound.   Review by G. W. Hill

One Live Badger: Remastered Edition

August, 18ReviewsNo comment

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ESOTERIC RECORDINGS are pleased to announce the release of a newly remastered edition of the classic 1973 live album by Badger.

• THE FIRST EVER OFFICIAL UK CD RELEASE FOR THIS CLASSIC 1973 ALBUM BY YES OFFSHOOT BADGER • FEATURING TONY KAYE & PRODUCED BY JON ANDERSON • NEWLY REMASTERED FOR THE FIRST TIME FROM THE ORIGINAL ATLANTIC MASTER TAPES • BOOKLET WITH NEW ESSAY & PHOTOGRAPHS & ROGER DEAN ARTWORK ESOTERIC RECORDINGS are pleased to announce the release of a newly remastered edition of the classic 1973 live album by Badger. Noted for their connection with the legendary YES, the band featured former Yes keyboard player TONY KAYE and bass guitarist and bass guitarist DAVID FOSTER (formerly in The Warriors with Jon Anderson and co-writer of ‘Sweet Dreams’ and ‘Time and a Word’ for YES), along with guitarist / vocalist BRIAN PARRISH and drummer ROY DYKE. Recorded in December 1972 at The Rainbow Theatre in London (when Badger supported YES on two shows that were filmed for the “Yessongs” concert movie). The band were warmly received as an opening act and their live performances were well crafted, encouraging Atlantic Records to offer a contract to release the highlights of Badger’s live set as a live album which was co-produced by JON ANDERSON. “One Live Badger” featured material such as ‘Wheel of Fortune’, ‘Wind of Change’ and ‘On the Way Home’ – fine tracks driven by Tony Kaye’s Hammond organ and Mellotron playing – and was greeted with enthusiasm by the Yes fan fraternity. This Esoteric Recordings edition is the first official UK CD release of the album and has been re-mastered from the original Atlantic Records master tapes. It includes a booklet featuring Roger Dean’s original album artwork (officially reproduced for the first time) and an essay. BADGER_web Track Listing: 1. WHEEL OF FORTUNE 2. FOUNTAIN 3. WIND OF CHANGE 4. RIVER 5. THE PREACHER 6. ON THE WAY HOME Badger Vocalist Brian Parrish has a new solo album ‘Traveller’ released on Friday 13th May 2016. Find out more from Brian’s official website here: www.brian-parrish.net  

CDTESTS.de REVIEW

August, 17ReviewsNo comment
logo Der Country-inspirierte Solo-Musiker Brian Parrish taufte sein 2016 erscheinendes Album auf den Namen „Traveller“. Er kombiniert dabei die Genres Country, Blues, Folk und Pop, indem er sowohl seine einzigartig rauchige Stimme, als auch sein Talent für die Kunst der Gitarre einsetzt. timthumb Bereits auf den Konzerten, die Brian Parrish vor Erscheinen seines Albums „Traveller“ gab, konnte sich der Solo-Künstler eine beständige Fan-Basis aufbauen. Die Songs des Country-Stars bestehen größtenteils aus Gitarre und Gesang, wobei stellenweise ein Schlagzeug im Hintergrund auftaucht. Parrish bedient sich beim Gitarrenspiel der Fingerstyle-Technik und erschafft somit einen unverwechselbaren Stil. Seine rauchige Stimme singt klagend über Herzschmerz, Fernweh und alltägliche Sorgen. Hierdurch schafft es Parrish, den Hörer auf einer sehr persönlichen Ebene anzusprechen. Sämtliche Songs wurden natürlich in höchster Qualität aufgenommen, was ein mehrfaches Hören des Albums „Traveller“ problemlos möglich macht. Für Country-Fans ist das Album „Traveller“ ebenso zu empfehlen wie für Pop-, Blues-, und Folk-Hörer.

ROCKTIMES REVIEW

August, 17ReviewsNo comment
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Es wäre schon glatt gelogen zu behaupten, dass die Vergangenheit des Engländers Brian Parrishnicht beeindruckend wäre. Mit The Londoners war er nicht nur als Begleitband für Gene Vincent und auch Jerry Lee Lewis aktiv, sondern in den Sechzigern auch für lange Perioden im legendären Hamburger Starclub gebucht. Er schrieb den Nr. 1-Hit "C'est mon imagination" für den französischen Rocker Johnny Hallyday, weitere Tracks für Dave, Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich oder Alvin Stardust, für die er auch arrangierte und produzierte. Er nahm zwei Alben mit dem Beatles-Produzenten George Martin auf, arbeitete mit Jon Lord und Graeme Edge (The Moody Blues). MitTony Kaye von Yes gründete er die zeitweise sehr erfolgreiche Band Badger und jammte darüber hinaus immer wieder mit Leuten wie etwa Peter Green, Herbie Hancock oder Eric Burdon. Keine schlechten Visitenkarten, wenn ihr mich fragt...
Im Jahr 2004 kam Brian Parrish im Zuge eines Starclub Special-Konzertes nach Deutschland zurück, wobei es ihm hier so gut gefiel, dass er seither im norddeutschen Worpswede wohnhaft ist. Dort entstand dann auch das Material zu seinem neuen Studioalbum "Traveller", für das er sich einige helfenden Hände ins Studio geladen hatte. Um nur mal zwei Beispiele zu nennen, sind hier Blue Weaver (Ex-Strawbs, Ex-Chicken Shack, Ex-Mott The Hoople) an den Keyboards und derVelvetone-Schlagzeuger Steff Ulrich mit am Start.
"Traveller" ist ein sehr persönliches Album geworden, auf dem Parrish viele Stationen und Erkenntnisse seines Lebens nochmal in Erinnerung ruft und verarbeitet. Musikalisch präsentiert er das Ganze in einem poprockigen Stil, gewürzt mit der einen oder anderen Dosis Blues und auch Soul. Die Stücke kommen zumeist im Midtempo und auch wenn dieser Vergleich hinkt, erinnern sie von der Ausrichtung an das (poppige, relaxte) Spätwerk eines Eric Clapton. Gitarristische Vergleiche müssen hier auch gar nicht erst angestellt werden, denn dafür sind die Soli von Parrish zu dezent angelegt und auch die Keyboards nehmen eine größere Rolle im Gesamtsound ein.
Rein gesanglich gesehen ist die Scheibe zwar kein Höhenflug, aber auch kein Reinfall. Die Stärke von "Traveller" liegt vor allem in dessen Gänze, wenn die einzelnen Zahnrädchen ineinander greifen, sich der Groove, die musikalische Umsetzung und die Texte miteinander verbinden. Sehr erfrischend kommen bei vier Titeln auch die beiden Background-Ladies Claudia Brinkmann sowie Mel Stahn (nicht immer als Duo) zum Einsatz. Die Produktion ist bis auf zeitweise etwas mechanisch klingende Drums ("Land Of The Night Games", da wurde wohl eher ein Sample vorgezogen) sehr gelungen und auch die Arrangements gefallen und gehen sehr gut ins Ohr.
Letzten Endes kann man wohl resümieren, dass "Traveller" von Brian Parrish ein aufgeräumtes, unaufgeregtes und dennoch sehr inspiriertes Album geworden ist. Wirklich heraus stechende Songs sind zwar nicht unbedingt zu finden, aber das muss ja auch nicht unbedingt der Fall sein, um von einer Scheibe überzeugt zu werden. Reinhören empfiehlt sich - wie so oft - auch hier, bevor man sich das Teil in die Anlage wirft bzw. ins Regal stellt.
Line-up: Brian Parrish (guitars, bass - #2,10-13, mandolin - #13, keyboards, loops, percussion, lead vocals) Stefan Ulrich (drums, bass - #9) 'Brother' Thomas Denzin (bass - #1,3,4,5,6) Blue Weaver (keyboards - #2,6,8,12, piano & accordion - #13, percussion) Axel Meyer (keyboards - #4,5,7,10) Peter Baumgarten (keyboards - #9) Luigi Stromboli (marimba -#10) Stromboli Brothers (horns - #4,12) Martin Ulrich (saxophone - #9) Tobias Vethake (cello - #13) Claudia Brinkmann (harmony vocals - #3,4,9) Mel Stahn (harmony vocals - #5,9)

Weser Kurier

August, 17ReviewsNo comment
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Brian Parrish veröffentlicht neues Album „Traveller“ als Gesamtkunstwerk aus Musik, Texten und Bildern
Klingende Souvenirs von vielen Reisen
Lars Fischer 21.04.2016 0 Kommentare
Brian Parrish © Lars Fischer
Brian Parrish hat auf seiner neuen CD „Traveller“ Eindrücke seiner vielen Reisen verarbeitet und nicht nur in Musik, sondern auch in Texten und Bildern festgehalten. (Lars Fischer)
Brain Parrish ist seit mehr als einem halben Jahrhundert Rockmusiker. Als er in den 60er-Jahren anfing, professionell Musik zu machen, war das am Markt entscheidende Medium noch die Vinyl-Single, die dann von der LP abgelöst wurde. „Wir waren heiß auf jedes neue Album, und dazu gehörte auch die Haptik“, erinnert er sich. Die großformatigen Cover waren oft Kunstwerke für sich, bedruckte Innenhüllen, opulente Klappcover oder zumindest das Backcover lieferten weitere Informationen, Bilder, Songtexte oder manchmal zusätzliche Linernotes. Das ist schon im CD-Zeitalter deutlich unwichtiger geworden und in Zeiten von Downloads völlig irrelevant. Lieder sind Dateien, ein paar beliebige Megabytes zum schnellen Hören nebenbei, flüchtiges Alltags-Beiwerk. Nicht, dass Parrish sich Entwicklungen widersetzt, aber er möchte seine Musik in einem anderen Kontext präsentieren und es dem Hörer überlassen, ob der tiefer eintaucht – oder eben nicht.

Im Sonderzug des letzten Sultans

So gibt es auf „Traveller“ zu jedem Lied nicht nur Lyrics und zusätzliche Informationen, sondern auch Fotocollagen mit mehr oder weniger offensichtlichen Anspielungen. Die Idee hinter den 13 Stücken ist, das Leben als eine Reise zu beschreiben. „Wahrscheinlich bin ich nicht als erster darauf gekommen“, gibt Parrish zu, aber für ihn sind Reisen neben der Musik selber eine wichtige Inspiration. Gerade ist er aus der Türkei zurückgekehrt und berichtet davon, wie er im Sonderzug des letzten Sultans saß. Im Song „Kandy Road“, bei dem sich an Dire Straits erinnernde Momente mit asiatischen Klängen verbinden, beschreibt er einen Trip durchs verregnete Sri Lanka. Sind die Lieder wie einzelnen Etappen, so ist die Musik die nicht endende Fortsetzungsstory seines Lebens, ist der Sänger und Gitarrist überzeugt. Dabei legt er sich nicht auf einen Stil fest, kommt aber immer wieder auf amerikanische Prägungen zurück. Das ist neben dem Blues mal ein wenig funkiger Soul wie in „Slow riding“, rockiger oder balladesk. Und die Themen der Stücke haben natürlich ebenso wie die Illustrationen mehrdimensionale, übertragbare Inhalte. Im Intro „Land of night games“ geht es um Träume, in „Talk to me“ um Kommunikation oder in „Don‘t waste my time“ um die Zeit, die einem bleibt, all das zu sagen, was einem wichtig ist. Für Brian Parrish, Jahrgang 1947 und von schwereren Erkrankungen nicht verschont geblieben, ein großes Thema. Aber neben den existenziellen Dingen bleibt auch Raum für augenzwinkernde Spielereien. Da sind beispielsweise die beiden Stromboli Brothers, die aussehen wie italienische Fliegerlegenden aus dem Ersten Weltkrieg und angeblich neben weiteren befreundeten Musikern wie Blue Weaver, Thomas Denzin, Claudia Brinkmann oder Melanie Stahn mitspielten. Erst ein zweiter Blick zeigt, dass es in Wirklichkeit Brian Parrish und Jochen Laschinsky (Ex-Mushroams, Blax) sind. In Laschinskys Odem-Studio in Lilienthal und in seinem eigenem Studio hat Parrish die CD auch eingespielt. Den letzten Schliff hat Steff Ulrich den Aufnahmen in Bremer Palais aux Etoiles verpasst. Der Schlagzeuger, der auch in Parrish‘ Liveband oder bei Velvetone und Dimple Minds trommelt, sei sein wichtigster Partner für diese Produktion gewesen, sagt Brain Parrish. Er fungiert ferner als Co-Produzent und erledigte das Mastering, die finale Abmischung, vor allem aber stand er dem Komponisten und Hauptakteur als konstruktiver Kritiker zur Seite. „Er gibt mir sozusagen die Stereo-Perspektive“, sagt Parrish, der nach einer Tumor-Operation nur noch auf einem Ohr hören kann. So ist es auch kein Witz, dass Parrish seinem Hörgeräte-Techniker im Booklet der CD dankt, denn ohne ihn würden dem musikalischen „Traveller“ doch viele Eindrücke entgehen. So aber geht die Reise weiter.

BLUES -GR Review – Brian Parrish

August, 17ReviewsNo comment
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British Rock n' Blues knight, Brian Parrish talks about his music experiences of yesterday and nowadays

"Technology has demystified music to the point where there is no sense of awe. There are good young players of course but few with any idea of history or context -therefore few have AUTHORITY."

Brian Parrish: The Rock n' Roll Traveller

Brian Parrish seems to have spent a large part of his recording career basking in the reflected glory of others, whether it be an early association with ex-Beatle producer George Martin, or from time spent under the guidance of Yes manager, Brian Lane. Born in July 1947, in Seven Kings, Essex in UK, Brian picked up his first guitar at the age of 11. He had a few lessons, but is basically self-taught. Both his father and grandfather are professional singers, so it follows that Brian's determination stayed with him throughout his school days, during the latter part of which he describes himself as being "a freak, a court jester", he would finish school for the day, would go home followed by his friends, pick up his guitar and sing Buddy Holly and Eddie Cochran songs all night. Fed up with providing free entertainment, he decided to change his image. He went to get a haircut. His hairdresser happened to mention that he played guitar, and before he knew it, they were forming a band which subsequently stayed together for 5 years - a large part of which was spent on the Continent playing at American service bases. Following his departure from the band in 1968, Brian spent some time concentrating on writing and production, in fact, a couple of his songs were recorded by Johnnie Halliday and Mike & Bernie Winters(!). A duo formed about a year later with a friend, Paul Gurvitz, and an album under the direction of George Martin was released in 1971 through EMI. The band, now consisting of five members went to the States early in 1972 for a tour, on which they supported Seals & Croft and B.J. Thomas among others. The band went down well, but Brian recalls the highlight of the tour being Elvis Presley and Bill Cosby concerts they were able to catch! Shortly after the band's return to England, and in the midst of management hassles, two members were made an offer by Peter Frampton, which they didn't hesitate in accepting. He joined forces with ex-Yes keyboard player, Tony Kaye, Roy Dyke on drums and David Foster on bass. They called themselves Badger, obtained a management deal with Brian Lane, and went on tour with Yes. Their album, which was produced with assistance from Jon Anderson, was recorded live at the Rainbow, and quickly shot into the Billboard chart. Brian left shortly after to pursue a solo career. Brian Parrish’s upcoming new album "TRAVELLER" will be release soon in the 2015. Interview by Michael Limnios What do you learn about yourself from the Rock & Roll culture and what does the blues mean to you? I learned that when you separate yourself from the rest of society (which is what happens when the majority of those you meet are musicians) it can bring a perspective on that society which some other people might not have. I am suspicious of most politicians for example! Rock n Roll in itself does not teach any particular moral or spiritual code. It HAS led me to my particular spiritual path, if I may explain: Rock n Roll began by cynically tapping into teenage fantasies, exploiting the young to take their dollars! It was controlled by the (middle aged) music business establishment, who fully believed it was a fad, providing a very limited window of opportunity. Nobody expected it to last. The songwriters were mostly middle aged and the target audience was white. The performers were white too. Only Little Richard was the great exception (I loved him most of all!). Richard was, of course, “covered” by the insipid and very white Pat Boone. Suddenly there was Elvis - a gift to the business as he had assimilated much of what was exciting about “black” music, but was white (and marketable!). Eventually artistes who were writing their own material began to enter the picture (Buddy Holly etc.) and things began to slowly change, but the colour divide remained. Blues was more or less unheard by white audiences. This was the music of the South which I have always loved. The way my generation in England first became aware of this musical treasure was via “Skiffle” music – Leadbelly and so on. Some of us were interested in why Little Richard was so much more exciting than anything else we were hearing. He had been “cleaned up” for the market, although we did not know that, but he was still so different, way better. Where had this come from? My journey has taken me through all of the changes in rock music, and inevitable led me to delve into the past-and investigate the blues roots. Blues is endlessly fascinating. It is a simple form which seems to continually reveal new layers. Blues can span the whole spectrum of emotion, and the connection is immediate, the rhythms primal, but somehow different performers find their own nuances. I learned respect for the men and women who laid the foundations, who walked the path against a background of intolerance and injustice on many levels, economic, political and more. I came to realize that the naïve music obsessed boy, buying into what the business was selling us, would have to drill down a little deeper. I found that there existed another strata of music which had been percolating all the while in parallel to what radio stations were playing. There was more incredible intoxicating music to be heard. There were life lessons to be learned from the performers and their experiences. I came to  look up to these people who had survived despite everything, and I came to believe that music played a life affirming sense of community and identification for them. It was central to the culture, or sub culture as I suppose it was. I have learned much about technique, songwriting etc. in my life and have been privileged to work with some talented people-and each one taught me something.  What I have learned about myself as a man, where I need to do my “spiritual work” has come in no small part from the quiet dignity shown by many of the people whose music and life stories have inspired me most. There are a few, but if I had to name just one it would be B.B. King. "It’s all the music that ever was distilled into the cultural melting pot of North America. The immigrants - Irish, French, German and of course African slaves as they then were in the South. The many races and cultures that combined to become 'Americans' and from this came musical gold."  How do you describe Brian Parrish sound and songbook? What characterize your music philosophy? It is hard for me to be objective about “my” sound. I have simply absorbed influences, as I think each musician does, and developed my playing along the way, hopefully. We all hear other great players, and might think “I like that sound! How is he doing that?” So you find out what amplifier he uses. You try one. Maybe he plays a Gibson, so you get one and play it. Along the way you probably realize that what you so admire about your hero comes from his fingers more than anything else. I am not sure that I have a signature “sound”. I am always looking to improve, to refine. Soundwise it is a never ending searching my case. I remember Ry Cooder talking about the large number of amps he has. He seemed to be saying that he is looking for something indefinable, which may or may not exist. That I understand! I think only a handful of players have an unmistakable sound. B.B. without a doubt, Carlos Santana. Eric Clapton gets an amazing fat sound from the Strats he mostly plays, but he too is recognizable as much for what he does. You know it´s him right from the start. I am not sure if I have that quality. Many people have told me they would know my voice anywhere. Whether that´s good or bad I don´t know! As for my songs, I suppose many a blues influenced, even blues based, though not all. I like many kinds of music and I just try to be open when I write. It is like scanning for a signal. When it comes I do not want to get weighed down in analysis, I just want to use such skills as I have to be sensitive to what the song is asking of me. I am almost not there! You could say “Brian” is best waiting outside of the delivery room. He will be needed when questions about arrangement need to be raised. It may be that I have a philosophy where lyrics are concerned. I am looking for something that has truth in it. I might be writing in character – some songs are not “me” but speak in the voice of someone I have invented. A few may be autobiographical, and some might be called philosophical, but hopefully never religious or “preachy”. If I could sum all this up I would have to say it is about truth, and there has to be love in it. This is what defines us, makes us human. What were the reasons that made the UK in 60s to be the center of Rock & Roll and R&B researches?                          (Photo: Brian Parrish on stage with Gene Vincent, London 1964) This is a complex question actually. I will try to simplify it-and bear in mind what you are hearing is MY opinion based on my own experiences. I believe the driving force was both economic AND social. Economically England was on the floor after the war. There was no money and the people who had fought were traumatized and longed for a quiet life. They wanted to carry on where they had been before the war interrupted everything. Entertainment would be big bands, crooners and comedians. America had continued to thrive, entering the war only in the last moments and via Hollywood films we saw the lifestyle we wanted to emulate. Rock n roll invaded suddenly from the U.S. and fired the imagination of young people and posed a huge ominous threat to the older generation. They must have been thinking “Is THIS what we were fighting for? The world is out of control!” and of course, it was-wonderfully so. We had “Skiffle” music (a very British phenomenon) which hinted at the roots of popular music, and it was not long before our young songwriters developed songs with an ironic twist. I knew a boy whose father had been a merchant seaman. His dad brought back many folk and rhythm and blues records from America. I think a similar thing was happening in ports around the county. Sailors who had been ashore in America visiting disreputable establishments and latching on to the music they heard. I have many friend from Liverpool for example, and it is no great surprise looking back, that there was such a musical explosion waiting to happen there. Young British musicians longed for “authenticity”. They found it in Howlin Wolf, Muddy Waters- the guys who had taken country blues to the city (Memphis, Chicago). They found  Big Bill Broonzy, and going further back, Mississippi Fred McDowell, Son House, Robert Johnson and so on. Outside of the Chitlin Circuit and Juke joints in the South this music had been ignored or forgotten in America. Segregation had everything to do with it and the music business of the time focused on good looking white boys. Some could sing-many could not. Even Berry Gordy (boss of Motown) was working at making his acts smooth and polished in order to cross over to a white audience, even if the stars had to use different bathrooms and restaurants to white folk. Britain hit home in the U.S. with our take on rock n roll / pop, and were vocal in their praise of the originators of the music, who were all but unknown in their home country. When the Stones arrived in the States a journalist asked “Now you are here what would you like to see?” They replied “We really want to see Muddy Waters”. The mystified journalist asked “Where´s that?” We had researched it because it was exotic to us. There was no racial element I think. We just heard something which was exciting and away from the mainstream. England was so dull and repressed after the war. There had been nothing for young people. When it came the world changed from black and white to technicolor and the cap would never fit back on the bottle. In a few years Otis Redding would be a big hit at one of the major white (hippy) rock festivals. Sly and the Family Stone lit everything up with funk played by black and white musicians. B.B. King played the Fillmore and was a big hit. BB acknowledged the great guitar players coming out of the U.K. and publicly voiced his gratitude to English R+B musicians for expanding the audience for blues. Far from “stealing” this music, we kept it alive. People like John Lee Hooker were reborn commercially. There can be few British bands who didn´t play “Boom Boom”!  We still had our unthreatening pop nonsense - Hermans Hermits or whatever, but the groundswell of blues based music moved everything forward and things would never be the same! "I do not know if such musicians have impacted social change or influenced anyone, other than by example. Political will and Spirituality is everything. Martin Luther King was the man who embodied all of this, and to whom we owe a debt that could never be repaid. Sadly so much more needs to be done. Might music help? I hope so." (Photo: Brian, Paul Gurvitz & George Martin) Which meetings have been the most important experiences for you? What is the best advice has given you? I am sure that you would like to hear about prominent or famous musicians who have been important to me, and many have, but when I try to think of meetings which have dramatically altered the course of my life, the first name I come up with is Barry Easter. Who is (or was) Barry Easter? He was the school friend I mentioned earlier who hipped me to Woody Guthrie and Leadbelly. I was around eleven years old I think. He was also the one who asked “Have you heard Little Richard?” I said “Who is he” Barry said “You HAVE to hear him!” I asked “What is he like?”. He answered” He is a lunatic!” I was more than curious. I sought Richard out-Awop bop alubop…. Lucille. A week or so later Barry asked “Did you hear Little Richard?” “Oh yes!” I said. “And…?”  “He is a lunatic!!” Of course there have been a few meetings which have affected me deeply, or influenced me directly, but I can trace all that subsequently happened to meeting Barry. I would love to chat with him now. The best advice I was ever given? How long have you got? I have received much good advice (I even acted on some of it!) I do remember two pieces of advice which are somehow linked. The first was from a fellow guitar player. I was telling him that I thought my playing was stagnating. I seemed unable to come up with anything new. He said “Copy someone you admire” This sounded like heresy to a creative man. Copy? He said “If you like what Eric Clapton does for example, remember that he listened to his heroes and tried to copy them. Freddy King, Albert King, Buddy Guy, Robert Johnson-it does not matter. Just soak it up. Your fingers on the strings will always sound like YOU. Everyone has a different touch, and we all borrow something. It does not happen in a vacuum” This advice seemed to unblock something. The second piece of advice was from a guy called Mickey Gallagher, who played keyboards with Parrish+Gurvitz (later with the Blockheads and others). I was in between projects, one band having broken up. I began to rehearse with what became Badger. I was writing songs in a funk style, you might say-but with Badger they were sounding very different. I was frustrated and also concerned with legal /contractual problems. I told Mickey about my misgivings. He said “You are a musician. That´s your gig. So PLAY. It´s what we do” Sounds simple, doesn´t it? It freed me up, stopped the analysis. Made me MUCH more accepting of what the other musicians were doing. They were great! Also Badger was extremely successful. I am still getting mails from people who love it to this day. Great advice, you see? Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us? I once did a gig with Fleetwood Mac in (the Peter Green incarnation). Peter had become a friend through a mutual acquaintance, who played drums with me. Peter insisted on playing bass (Fender 6 string) with me on lead guitar. Talk about strange! This was a time when Peter was being lauded as one of the 4 great British blues guitarists, the others being Mr. Page, Eric and Jeff Beck. The crowd loved it, although Peter’s bandmates were clearly confused. What was I thinking? On another occasion Herbie Hancock sat in with my band. I do not remember much. Herbie was gracious, outclassed us in every way-and I was simply thrilled to be in the same room as the great man. What do you miss most nowadays from the music of past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of? I miss the “build it from the inside” approach –which had to do with “feel”-real human feel. Arrangements were formed, in the main, from what had been created in the dialogue between the rhythm section. Now it seems to begin with a computer. To me the song is everything, and all that is played (yes played, not sequenced) should serve the song. Buddy Guy says he fears for the future of the blues. I still think the blues may “save” us culturally. When most of us (outside of America) became aware of the blues popular music was white dominated , lacking passion and relied on promoting good looking stars. Mainly young men, as the marketers were targeting teenage girls. Then came the blues, rediscovered and much blues influenced music and a greater awareness of the great black talent in rhythm and blues. Everything began to change and these days popular culture embraces black and white artistes alike and it should also be noted that a very high percentage of female artistes are successful. What has not changed is the mindset of the marketers who are still looking to sell their female artistes to girls. The truly worrying thing now that television and image are once again dominating is that the music has become sterile. A conveyer belt of programmed beats with accompanying videos of obligatory sexualized dance steps performed by styled pretty people. The marketing may be more sophisticated but we have come full circle. I have nothing against computers. I use them. BUT we need an organic approach to music. The “human / handmade” element is gone. I believe the answer lies in maintaining the blues roots and encouraging people to go to live concerts. Most people do not understand, or have respect for the creative process and musicianship. Any fool with an iPad can get an app which will allow them to access samples and make what probably sounds like music. They probably believe this is how we do it! Technology has demystified music to the point where there is no sense of awe. There are good young players of course but few with any idea of history or context -therefore few have AUTHORITY. You can go on YouTube and find an 11 year old Korean boy, guitar in hand, shredding like a maniac. Technically way beyond what I could do even if I wanted to (I don´t!!) Without phrasing and feel for spaces it is not music. Merely notes. I am similarly unimpressed by the line of young girls on TV talent shows copying Whitney Houston. You have to understand what and why of what you are doing to produce any emotion. There needs to be an emotional vocabulary more than “right” notes. A great musician said “A mistake can be overlooked, but to play without feel is unforgivable”. That is the truth.   It may be a while before people figure out we have lost something which is to be treasured. In the blues I see a glimmer of hope. More than a glimmer. I hope I am right! If you could change one thing in the musical world and it would become a reality, what would that be? I believe I have already said it - but to simplify, I wish that music rather than all the trappings (costumes, dance routines etc.) would be the focus. I am tired of people who seem to want to be “famous” more than they want to create great music. We were lucky to have started the way we did. You had to work to find recordings by some artistes. It cost something and so we appreciated it more. Now everything is one or two clicks away. We need to get our priorities straightened out! The other problem is that the digital age is killing the earning potential for many musicians. I am going to jump outside the parameters of your question. I would change TWO things. The second is to find mechanisms whereby musicians can be appropriately paid. I am not talking about getting rich-merely that guys who work at their music, creating something for people to enjoy can be financially rewarded enough to keep doing it. Re structuring streaming platforms and re-educating users would be a start. Many people want music for nothing. A tailor will not spend time and skill making a beautiful suit-and give it away! What are the lines that connect the legacy of Rock & Roll and R&B from United States to UK and Europe? It’s a continuum isn´t it? It’s all the music that ever was distilled into the cultural melting pot of North America. The immigrants - Irish, French, German and of course African slaves as they then were in the South. The many races and cultures that combined to become “Americans” and from this came musical gold. We imitated it in Europe to some extent, eventually introducing nuances and embellishments of our own. I suppose the “lines which connect the legacy” as you put it, reside in people like me. We are to some extent keepers of the flame. We now have a groundswell of interest in “World Music”-stuff from Mali, Senegal and so on. It is very healthy. Ultimately good for music. But what connects the musical legacy of U.S. R+B to Europe? We do! I put on a Little Richard record and it lives in me. It is the same with all the old blues records. It must not die with me and others of my generation! What has made you laugh lately and what touched (emotionally) you from the music circuits? What has made me laugh? Kanye West. What has touched me emotionally is that despite serious illness among the members of Little Feat (one of my FAVOURITE bands) they are once again on the road. Richie Hayward, their original drummer passed away a couple of years back and Paul Barrere, a great slide player has also been battling health issues, but they are still standing! This makes me emotional. "Young British musicians longed for 'authenticity'. They found it in Howlin Wolf, Muddy Waters- the guys who had taken country blues to the city (Memphis, Chicago). They found  Big Bill Broonzy, and going further back, Mississippi Fred McDowell, Son House, Robert Johnson and so on. Outside of the Chitlin Circuit and Juke joints in the South this music had been ignored or forgotten in America." What is the impact of Rock n’ Roll culture and R&B music to the racial and socio-cultural implications? It is impossible not to recognize that R&B music has always upheld racial equality, putting music first. Otis Redding´s band – basically the Booker T Jones & the MGs guys were both black and white. Using different bathrooms and restaurants on the road. How shameful. A tragedy. But this was the world “outside” and had nothing to do with their relationships. Duck Dunn, Steve Cropper and co were white guys playing “black” influenced music recorded in Muscle Shoals. This came out of the South where the greatest racial tensions have always been. I do not know if such musicians have impacted social change or influenced anyone, other than by example. Political will and Spirituality is everything. Martin Luther King was the man who embodied all of this, and to whom we owe a debt that could never be repaid. Sadly so much more needs to be done. Might music help? I hope so. Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really wanna go for a whole day..? I would travel back somewhere I have already been. My musical education made a giant leap when I played the Star Club Hamburg. It was so exciting, and I met many young musicians who became life-long friends. Many have left us now, and it would be really great to meet some of them again as the young men they were. A trip to Hamburg circa 1964-5 please! If you want to stretch my imagination to take in somewhere I have never been, I would like to be invisible (attracting no attention to my skin color) and take in a James Brown performance at the Apollo. That´s not a whole day, but I would be happy with that. Brian Parrish - Official website

Musik Reviews dot DE

Mai, 25ReviewsNo comment

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Brian Parrish: Traveller (Review)

Thoralf Koß (Info)(Review 410x gelesen, veröffentlicht am )25Wer‘s weiß, bekommt 12 Punkte und einen ganz heißen Tipp namens BRIAN PARRISH dazu! Lösung: Im Hamburger Star-Club verdienten sich die BEATLES als fest angestellte Musiker ihre Sporen, mit denen sie dann zu unangefochtenem Weltruhm gelangten! Wer aber weiß, dass neben ihnen auch BRIAN PARRISH im Star-Club fest angestellt war und einen ähnlichen Weg wie die BEATLES zu beschreiten versuchte? Niemand, oder? Auch weiß sicher kaum jemand, dass BRIAN PARRISH gemeinsam mit dem vor kurzem verstorbenen BEATLES-Produzenten GEORGE MARTIN zwei LPs aufnahm. Oder seine Band THE LONDONERS in den 60ern große Popularität genoss. Ganz davon zu schweigen, dass er mit GENE VINCENT und JERRY LEE LEWIS oder PETER GREEN und HERBIE HANCOCK gemeinsam musizierte. Selbst ERIC BURDON und JON LORD oder TONY KAYE standen an seiner Musiker-Seite. Er ist wirklich ein Musik-Reisender, dieser „TravellerBRIAN PARRISH, der beim Öffnen des Booklets in fetten Buchstaben feststellt: „We are all Travellers“! Ja, nur setzen sich leider viel zu viel von uns ständig komplett überflüssige Grenzen! BRIAN PARRISH jedenfalls gehört nicht dazu. So saust er mit seiner musikalischen Zeitmaschine nostalgisch durch den Blues-Rock, Folk, Pop und Soul, lässt sich dabei sogar von Bläsern und einer grandios agierenden Band unterstützen, die ihm mitunter ein Flair verleihen, wie wir es von TOM PETTY, den DIRE STRAITS und ganz besonders ERIC CLAPTON kennen. Den Titel „Mr. Slowhand“ könnte man locker, wenn er nicht bereits vergeben wäre, auch BRIAN PARRISHverleihen. Gerade bei den bluesigen Balladen, wie „Angel Of Death“ oder „Blue“, kommt einem zusätzlich sofort CHRIS REA in den Sinn, der ja nach seinen Nahtod-Erlebnissen auch gehörig auf den Blue(s) gekommen ist. Parrish setzt außerdem, was heutzutage leider viel zu wenig geschieht, getreu den 60ern und 70ern auf absolut professionell klingende Background-Sänger(innen), die auch gerne immer mal wieder in den Vordergrund treten dürfen. „Don‘t Waste My Time“ hat dadurch beispielsweise genau die Ausstrahlung, die man von einem echten, leicht finsteren Blues-Song erwartet, der sofort unter die Haut geht! Textlich drehen sich die Themen um viel Zwischenmenschliches, aber auch die Achtung der Natur und aller Gefahren, die uns umgeben und hinter Gier und Größenwahn lauern. „Angel Of Death“ rechnet diesbezüglich unerbittlich damit ab, dass für uns das Morden von Menschen, Tieren und Natur zur Selbstverständlichkeit geworden ist. Nur gut, dass wir in dem dicken, 24 Seiten umfassenden Booklet nicht nur alle Lyrics, sondern auch persönliche Bemerkungen des Musikers mitlesen und dazu passende Bild-Collagen bewundern können. So gesehen begleiten wir BRIAN PARRISH textlich, optisch und musikalisch auf seiner Reise durchs eigene Ich und alles um ihn herum, wobei ihn neben uns natürlich auch außergewöhnliche Musiker der „älteren Generation“ unterstützen, egal ob das nun BLUE WEAVER von den STRAWBS oder der MOTT THE HOOPLE-Schlagzeuger STEFF ULRICH ist. Mit „Diamonds And Pearls“ geht dann unsere Reise durch den Parrish-Musik-Horizont sehr traurig und etwas melancholisch zu Ende, denn Brian widmet den letzten Blues seinem Vater, der ihm seine erste Gitarre geschenkt und so seine Reise beginnen ließ: „If he had never done anything else, this alone would have been more than I could repay.“ Und irgendwie kommen einem dann auch noch ähnliche Bilder in den Sinn, wie sie in einem entstanden, als man das erste mal Claptons „River Of Tears“ hörte. Wer diese Musik-Reise nicht bucht, ist selber schuld und sollte weiterhin nur noch an den Radio-Tasten drehen. Auch da gibt‘s viel zu entdecken, wie fein formatierte Scheiße. Den Blues dazu aber spielt BRIAN PARRISH! FAZIT: Eigentlich müsste BRIAN PARRISH genauso wie die BEATLES eine Legende sein. Ist er jedoch nicht, dafür aber ist er eine echte Blues-Entdeckung, die einem Clapton genauso das Wasser reichen kann wie den DIRE STRAITS. Trotzdem kann ihm eins niemand nehmen, nämlich dass auch seine musikalische Laufbahn genau wie die der BEATLES im Hamburger Star-Club begann! [Album bei Amazon kaufen]

GREEN BRAIN – Review

Mai, 20ReviewsNo comment
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Brian Parrish- composer, singer, guitar player performed in the Star Club Hamburg with his band The Londoners as the Beatles did. They were a popular attraction. Before this he had accompanied original rock n roll artiste, Gene Vincent (Be Bop Alula). He later recorded also with Jerry Lee Lewis, another pioneer. Brian Parrish´s songwriting credits included hits for Johnny Hallyday, who was hugely popular in France. His “pop” credentials included songs for Dave Dee, Dozy Beaky Mick &Titch, Alvin Stardust and others. He played on hits by Medicine Head, albums by Jon Lord, Graeme Edge and others. Together with Paul Gurvitz he formed Parrish & Gurvitz. Sir George Martin produced their acclaimed albums as the Beatles were disintegrating. Hailed as “the new Beatles” Parrish recalls it as “a complement certainly, but the kiss of death!” He formed the band Badger with Yes keyboard man, Tony Kaye. Their first album recorded live in concert (One Live Badger) was widely acclaimed and achieved chart success in the USA. This earned Parrish his prog- rock credentials, although his next solo effort “Love On My Mind” had a “blue eyed soul” funk flavour. Changing direction seems to have been a hallmark of his career. He guested with friend, Eric Burdons band shortly thereafter, and over the following years concentrated more on writing / producing. Performing began to play a secondary role.So it might have remained, but he returned to full time performing in 2004 when he was invited to perform in Hamburg as a special guest for a Star Club reunion concert, with great success. His life changed direction and he now lives and works in Germany. He has a new album TRAVELLER out on Sireena Records. He describes it as a series of musical journeys embracing numerous styles, reflecting many facets of the human experience. It is the “last concept album!” he says, but absolutely different to the Gothic pseudo classical style which typified the genre. “Each experience which contributes to our individual story is a mini journey, you could say. In the end we are all travellers. This is the simple theme which unifies the diverse moods of the album”TRAVELLER is presented with a 24 page booklet with photo illustrations along with lyrics. It begins with the “journey” of dreams (Land of the Night games) and encompasses mortality (Angel of Death) and takes in sex, love, trust, joy and pain along the way. “All the stuff you would expect” says Parrish. Brian Parrish is a “vintage” musician who has brought the music of a lifetime together in one album. Brian Parrish, Komponist, Sänger und Gitarrist war, so wie die Beatles, einer der Originalkünstler des Hamburger Star-Clubs und erreichte mit seiner Band The Londoners große Popularität. Sein erstes großes Engagement war es den Rock 'n' Roll-Star Gene Vincent zu begleiten. Es folgten weitere Kooperationen u.a. mit Jerry Lee Lewis. Brian war zudem als Komponist für andere Künstler tätig. Für den französichen Star Johnny Hallyday schrieb er den Nr. 1 Hit 'C'est mon Imagination'. Er schrieb Poptitel für Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Titch und produzierte, komponierte und arrangierte Songs für Alvin Stardust. Zusammen mit dem kürzlich verstorbenen Beatles-Produzenten George Martin nahm er zwei LPs auf. Weiterhin spielte er mit Jon Lord von Deep Purple sowie mit Graeme Edge von The Moody Blues und machte mit ihnen Plattenaufnahmen. Zusammen mit der Tastenlegende Tony Kaye von YES gründete Brian die Band Badger! Das Debütalbum 'One Live Badger' erreichte gleich große Popularität und stieg hoch in die amerikanischen Billboard Charts. Er gab Jam Sessions mit Größen wie Herbie Hancock und Peter Green von Fleetwood Mac. Nicht zu vergessen die nächtelangen philosophischen Diskussionen mit Freund George Harrison. Mitte der Siebzigerjahre spielte Brian mit Eric Burdon während einer europaweiten Tournee zusammen. Die folgenden Jahre waren dem Schreiben von Songs und zahlreichen Musikproduktionen gewidmet. Seine Zusammenarbeit mit Medicine Head (One and One is One) erweiterete seine Reputation. Im Jahre 2004 kam Brian für ein Star-Club Special Concert zurück nach Deutschland - und ließ sich in der Künstlerkolonie Worpswede vor den Toren von Bremen nieder. In der kreativen Atmosphäre Worpswedes entstand seine neueste CD 'Traveller'. 13 wunderbare Originalsongs beschreiben seine eigene Lebensreise, seine Erfahrungen sowie seine Reise durch die eigenen Gefühlswelten. 'We are all Travellers!' Ein sehr persönliches, ausgesprochen starkes Album, das er mit einer Anzahl hochkarätiger Begleitmusker aufgenommen hat. Dabei u.a. Blue Weaver, früher einmal bei den Strawbs und Mott The Hoople und Velvetone-Trommler Steff Ulrich. Der CD beigfügt ist ein 24 Seiten starkes kunstvolles Booklet, das sämtliche Texte der CD sowie persönliche Anmerkungen von Brian Parrish enthält.

FFM ROCK REVIEW

Mai, 13ReviewsNo comment

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BRIAN PARRISH - Traveller

VÖ: 13.05.16 (Sireena/ Broken Silence) Genre:13 Rock, Blues Homepage: BRIAN PARRISH Man kann den Gitarristen BRIAN PARRISH wohl ohne Übertreibung als eines der Urgesteine der Musikszene bezeichnen. Mit THE LONDONERS gehörte er neben den BEATLES zu den Originalkünstlern des Hamburger Star Clubs, spielte mit GENE VINCENT und JERRY LEE LEWIS und schrieb zahlreiche Hits für Künstler wie JOHNNY HALLYDAY. Weitere Namen in seiner Vita sind JON LORD, PETER GREEN und ERIC BURDON, wobei es den Rahmen sprengen würde hier alle seine Karrierestationen aufzuzählen. Mittlerweile lebt PARRISH in einer Künstlerkolonie in Worpswede bei Bremen und hier ist auch sein neues Album „Traveller“ entstanden. Ein sehr persönliches Werk, das seine Lebensreise beschreibt, von seinen Erfahrungen lebt und den Hörer an seinen Gefühlswelten teilhaben lässt. Musikalisch bietet „Traveller“ eine Mischung aus Rock, Blues, Soul und auch ein bisschen Pop. Dabei beginnt PARRISH das Album sogar mit leicht progressiven Klängen, wendet sich dann aber immer mehr den eingängigeren Songs zu, ohne dabei allerdings zu seicht zu werden. Unterstützt wird der Gitarrist dabei u.a. von BLUE WEAVER, der auch schon bei MOTT THE HOOPLE aktiv war und VELVETONE-Drummer STEFF ULRICH. Fazit: Wer BRIAN PARRISH bisher auf seiner musikalischen Reise begleitet hat, wird auch weiter mit ihm reisen, aber auch alle anderen toleranten Anhänger des Blues Rock sollten hier mal ein Ohr riskieren. Anspieltipps: „Talk To Me“, „When It’s Over“ und „Angel Of Death“.
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BADGER – new offical release – 2016

April, 29brian P...No comment
The ever popular and oft reissued album "One Live Badger" will be officially released in 2016 on Esoteric Records (part of Cherry Red).The release is taken from the original master and promises to be of the highest quality. The album is having a facelift. It will be repackaged with the original Roger Dean Badger painting so beloved by fans over the years, but with all new sleeve notes and information. There have been numerous unoffical releases of the album over the past years, and the quality has been variable ranging from bad to not very good. Now fans will be able to obtain the record in highest digital quality. For further information click the link: http://www.cherryred.co.uk/product/one-live-badger-remastered-edition/

Musik Zirkus Magazin

April, 16ReviewsNo comment
MusikZirkus-Magazin header Brian Parrish - Traveller Sireena Records / Broken Silence Distribution (2016) (13 Stücke, 61:50 Minuten Spielzeit) Brian Parrish’s Musikgeschichte geht weit in die 60’er Jahre zurück. Neben Engagements bei der Rock’n’Roll-Größe Gene Vincent folgten Kooperationen unter anderem mit Jerry Lee Lewis. Als Mitglied der Band The Londoners trat er um 1964 auch im denkwürdigen Hamburger Starclub auf. Er spielte mit Deep Purples Jon Lord und Graeme Edge von The Moody Blues und gründete mit dem Keyboarder Tony Kaye (Yes) die Band Badger. Und zusammen mit Paul Gurvitz veröffentlichte er drei Alben. 01_CoverX Auch Sessions mit Herbie Hancock und Peter Green (Fleetwood Mac) gehören zu seiner Vita. Und in den 70’er Jahren tourte er mit Eric Burdon. Als Komponist schrieb er darüber hinaus Songs für Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick And Titch, Alvin Stardust und Johnny Hallyday. Seit 2004 lebt der Brite vor den Toren von Bremen. Nach seinem 2007’er Soloalbum „Endgame“ veröffentlicht er am 12.05.2016 sein neuestes Album „Traveller“. 13 wunderbare Originalsongs beschreiben seine eigene Lebensreise, seine Erfahrungen sowie seine Reise durch die eigenen Gefühlswelten. „We Are All Travellers!“ Ein sehr persönliches, ausgesprochen starkes Album, das er mit einer Anzahl hochkarätiger Begleitmusiker aufgenommen hat. Dabei u. a. Blue Weaver, früher einmal bei den Strawbs und Mott The Hoople und Velvetone-Trommler Steff Ulrich. So beschreibt es ein Auszug aus dem Pressetext. Wer nach der obigen Vita nun Rock’n’Roll oder verstaubten Pop vermutet, der liegt völlig falsch. „Traveller“, das in einem vierseitigen Digipack mit 24seitigem Booklet daherkommt, bietet besten Rock mit Countryeinschlag. Atmosphärische Gitarren eröffnen den Opener „Land Of The Night Games“. Der Rhythmus erinnert ein wenig an Peter Gabriel. Allerdings sorgt die angenehme Gesangsstimme für eine ganz andere Stimmung. Mit diesem wunderbaren, leicht rockigen Song mit Ethno- und Popappeal startet die CD sehr viel versprechend. Leider ist der Song nur knapp zwei Minuten lang und damit viel zu kurz. Ethnische Rhythmen wie aus einer Kasba kommen dann in „Kandy Road“ auf. Dann folgen Sounds die den Track in Richtung der Dire Straits schieben. Der nächste Song „When Its Over“ beginnt gar mit einem Gitarrenriff, das an „Long Tall Woman“ von The Hollis erinnert. Der Song entwickelt sich aber zu einem rockigen Track mit leichtem Blueseinschlag. Der Titeltrack hingegen ist eine Bluesrocknummer, die auch gut Eric Clapton zu Gesicht stehen würde. Und auch stimmlich ist Brian nicht ganz weit Weg von Mr. Slowhand. Funk und Bläsersätze gibt es dann in „Slow Riding“. Im Mittelteil bietet er dann noch ein hinreißendes Gitarrensolo. „Blue“ ist dann noch so eine unwiderstehliche langsame Bluesnummer. Die Melodie setzt sich sofort im Ohr fest. Noch so ein Song der nach Eric Clapton klingt ist „The Time Will Come“. Hier mischt Parrish dann aber noch einige Westcoastschnipsel ein. Die Gitarre klingt auch in einigen Passagen nach Steely Dan. Mit „Summer Day“ kommt ein Poprock-Song, der einfach nur Spaß macht, aber so manch bekannten Sound bereithält. In „Love Like This“ lassen dann die Eagles grüßen. Mit „Diamonds And Pearls“ endet die CD recht beschaulich im sanften Countrystil. Auf dem Album zeigt sich, welch Gefühl Brian für herrliche Melodien hat. Dabei verpackt er sie in den unterschiedlichsten Stilrichtungen und das so perfekt, das alles genau zusammen passt. „Traveller“ ist eine sehr schöne, teils atmosphärische Platte mit vielen tollen Melodien. Stephan Schelle, April 2016

Brian P. Blog …

Februar, 21brian PNo comment
Brian Parrish, a British musician who now lives in Germany, said he is looking forward to the upcoming memorial concert April 13 in Hamburg for Tony Sheridan. Ted Taylor “Tony was there right from the first,” Parrish told us via Skype from Germany. Many of Tony's friends will be attending the benefit being held at the Kaiserkeller, one of the places in Hamburg they played before they were famous. Those confirmed for the show include Ted “Kingsize” Taylor, who played with theBeatles in Liverpool and recorded them at the Star-Club, Neil Landon, Brian Parrish, Ecki Hofmann, Karl Terry and Gibson Kemp, and bands including the Rattles, Foxie “B,” “Rock 'n' Soul Circus, the Bonds, London Pride and the Blackbirds. The Kaiserkeller was the scene of many performances by the Beatles before they became famous. Parrish also said organizers have been in contact with Klaus Voormann and that Astrid Kirchherr might also attend. “I'm also interested to see who comes from Liverpool,” he said. Parrish remembered seeing Sheridan on TV. “When I first went to Hamburg in 1964, I used to see Tony Sheridan on a British rock n' roll show called 'Oh, Boy,'” he said. “All of the guys at the time, the homegrown stars, were trying to be Elvis. Most people were doing hip shaking they saw Elvis doing. Twitter and Facebook is much appreciated. Please hit the “like” button on Facebook if you like our work. We're also Steve Marinucci on Facebook and at Ufollow or Pinterest. And don't miss our weekly Beatles news podcast “Things We Said Today” available oniTunes, Podbean.com and Beatles-a-Rama and Fab4Radio.com on the weekends.

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  • Release dateMarch 27, 2013
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